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LBCAC adds new event to 2024

lbcac adds barefoot joel

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Courtesy of LBCAC

Joel Robinson – Barefoot Joel

–Saturday, Dec. 30, 2 p.m.

Storyteller/Naturalist Barefoot Joel/Our Story Nature Walk

Join your friends from the Laguna Beach Cultural Arts Center (LBCAC) and Barefoot Joel, Naturalist Guide, on an easygoing, engaging walk to Barbara’s Lake, the largest of three natural lakes in Laguna Canyon.

During the walk, Barefoot Joel will recall true stories of our area, from the times when grizzly bears, jaguars, condors and wolves still roamed the secluded valley. Together, you’ll stop frequently to appreciate the diversity of plants and wildlife, while learning more about Laguna’s history, including how we got the name “Laguna Beach” (Spoiler alert: It’s not what you think!).

Joel Robinson is the director of Naturalist For You, a 17-year-old environmental education nonprofit based in Orange County. He has guided interpretive nature walks, reenacted living history, restored wildlife habitat, conducted biological surveys and organized environmental classes, workshops, presentations and events for the public benefit since 2001.

Meet at 2 p.m. at the parking lot of Nix Nature Center, 18751 Laguna Canyon Road, Laguna Beach

“Our Story” Nature Walk Details:

Difficulty: The dirt trail is an easy/moderate 1.7-mile loop, with just a few hundred feet of elevation (minimal).

Exposure: Full sun, so please wear a hat and/or sunscreen, along with comfortable trail shoes.

No Food or Drink Provided: Please bring enough for approximately two hours.

Parking: Carpool, $3 daily (machine accepts $1 bills and quarters or Visa/Master Card).

To register, go to www.lbculturalartscenter.org.

Saturday, Jan. 5 and Sunday, Jan. 6, 7:30-9:50 p.m.

Change the Game, A Rock Musical

To win an election, you have to build your house on rock not sand. Don’t let the developers tear down the house. Give the rock a great guitar solo. And make sure you’re on time for class.

Synopsis: The students at Cal State San Marita want to take on big-money developers. They ask their political philosophy professor to run for office, after all, he seems to know about grassroots empowerment. Powered by Grandma’s tamales and books by Paulo Freire and Gloria Anzaldúa, they find a winning message about community when the community is patchwork of different ethnicities and blended races. But getting a foothold only turns up the pressure. Will they play ball with the bare-knuckled governor? Is grandma right about Brenda’s good-looking but overly ambitious boyfriend? Is winning everything, or just better than losing? What happened to all those ideas in Pedagogy of the Oppressed? Maybe the bottom-line political question isn’t how to win, but how to change the game.

For tickets, click here.

LBCAC is located at 235 Forest Ave., Laguna Beach.

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Shakespeare and opera buffs are going to love January at the Susi Q

Continuing the goal of supporting the arts in Laguna Beach, the Susi Q will present two programs in the new year that will delight lovers of Shakespeare and of opera.

On Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2024 from 4-5:30 p.m., in partnership with Lyric Opera of Orange County, Susi Q will host a production of Puccini’s La Bohème

Lyric Opera OC’s operas are presented in a concert format, with minimal to no staging or costumes, but with piano accompaniment. English supertitles appear on Susi Q’s large flatscreen TVs to aid the audience in following the story behind the opera.

“[In this opera], a poet, a painter, a musician and a philosopher are living together in Paris when one freezing Christmas Eve their lives are changed forever,” explained Diana Farrell, Lyric Opera OC’s artistic director/president.

Shakespeare and opera buffs cast

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Courtesy of Susi Q

Members of Lyric Opera of Orange County

The audience will enjoy an intimate up-close, one-of-a-kind, operatic performance featuring guest conductor Jacob Sustaita of the Pacific Symphony, and starring a distinguished LOOC cast of eight. The performance is generously sponsored by Faye and Wayne Baglin and Joy Dittberner.

While the concert itself is free, there will be a registration fee of $5 to cover administrative costs. Doors open at 3:15 p.m. for light refreshments. Click here to register. Parking will be limited, so consider carpooling, ride sharing or city transportation.

Julie Lupton’s “Shakespeare Reading Circle” is another Susi Q nod to the classics of the past. She’ll lead participants – you – in reading from Shakespeare’s play The Merry Wives of Windsor. The play, focused on love and marriage, jealousy and revenge, features Falstaff – who appears in the Henry IV and V plays – as a man in love.

Lupton assigns parts scene by scene, breaking frequently for discussion. No background in Shakespeare or drama is required.

During the course of Lupton’s program, she’ll be reviewing clips from Verdi’s Falstaff which she calls “the play’s greatest adaptation and operatic masterpiece.”

And in a happy coincidence, Lyric Opera’s next presentation at the Susi Q following La Boheme will be Falstaff on April 24.

Lupton, Ph.D., is the co-director of UCI’s New Swan Shakespeare Center and Distinguished Professor of English at UC Irvine.

Shakespeare Reading Circle: “The Merry Wives of Windsor” will take place on consecutive Tuesdays between 4 and 5:30 p.m., beginning January 30 with the last session on February 27. This class is being offered only on Zoom. Click here to register.

To RSVP by phone, call 949.715.8105, or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

The Susi Q offers a wide range of educational and fun programs, classes and clubs for older adults – though all ages are welcome. The Susi Q’s Care Management Department provides free consultation, education and practical resources for vulnerable seniors, enabling them to stay safe, informed and independent. For more information on The Susi Q, the portal to access the best of Laguna’s community resources, visit www.thesusiq.org.

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New perspective: LPAPA Squared, a juried show, displays variety of scenes, subjects by established and new artists

By THERESA KEEGAN

An annual December juried art show became more than an opportunity to find a perfect gift for a special someone this year – it also acted as a generational bridge bringing together diverse – and very talented – painters. This the fourth year the Laguna Plein Air Painters Association has hosted their all members “squared” show, in which all the art presented is eight by eight inches.

The opening reception on December 7, where winners were announced, was a jam-packed event, with artists happily talking about their work while the public was admiring everything from portraits to landscapes.

“There was so much going on with 150 pieces in the show,” said artist Michael Obermeyer, “and it was an open topic, so that brings out a lot of people to see it.” As the judge for the juried art show, Obermeyer had an opportunity to spend time with the work before the show opened to the public.

new perspective Mogilka

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Courtesy of LPAPA

The LPAPA open format at the members show allowed artists to submit work that was created in studios, as well as painted outdoors. Kelley Mogilka’s “A Moment of Rest” was awarded first place in the Artist Member category.

Being primarily a landscape painter, Obermeyer has an acknowledged affinity toward that subject matter, but as he looked at the different subject matters and quality of the submissions, he had his own realizations – he really just loves all types of art.

“It’s such a variety (of art) within this show,” he said.  “And it’s not just the Signatures that were impressive – it’s an open topic so there were so many interesting subjects.”

As an all-member juried show, LPAPA Squared offers a level platform for all participants. The awards were divided into three membership categories, Signature, Artist and Student, with first through third place awards and an honorable mention. “I really wish I could’ve given out more honorable mentions,” said Obermeyer. “It was tough.”

The Signature Member winners included: Jason Li for Tide Pools, first place; Debra Huse for Telluride Dreams, second place; Jeff Sewell, Coming in Peace, third place and Geoff Allen, Red Sails honorable mention.

new perspective Jason Tide Pools

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Courtesy of LPAPA

The Signature Member category included work by established artists. Jason Li’s “Tide Pools” was awarded first place.

The Artist Member winners included: Kelley Mogilka for A Moment of Rest, first; Kirsten Larimer, Rockpile Laguna Beach, second, Mary Christie Family, Dana Point, third and Marilyn Wear, Happy at Sea, honorable mention.

Student Members had two honorable mentions that were awarded to Michael Hahka for Invitational Sweets and Jonathan McHugh for Sunday Afternoon at Laguna.

“I’m really excited and honored,” said Mogilka. “It’s validation to keep going. You get so isolated in your own work, and it can be really hard to think it’s good enough. When you have an external thing, like an award, that’s somebody else validating you.”

new perspective Kelley

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Courtesy of Kelley Mogilka

LCAD professor and LPAPA member Kelley Mogilka encourages her students to be involved with the LPAPA arts community.

As a new instructor at Laguna College of Art + Design, having recently completed the school’s MFA program, Mogilka looks to LPAPA as a force in her art. She had previously won the group’s Next Generation Paint Out award during an Invitational.

“It’s just such great exposure,” she said. “LPAPA is a really great first step for students coming out of school because of all the knowledge that’s within the group.”

Mogilka credits the group’s supportive environment, as well as its extensive experience within the field, as wonderful guideposts for someone starting a career.

“I really push my students to get involved,” she said. Not only is their exposure to the technical aspects of being an artist, but also the reality of what it’s like to be a professional artist.

“When you choose painting as a career path, you do it for no other reason that you love it – as delusional as that may be,” said Mogilka. “But it’s amazing. I’m super grateful for what I’ve learned through LPAPA. It helps to know you’re on the right track.”

new perspective Kirsten Larimer

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Courtesy of Kirsten Larimer

Kirsten Larimer recently moved to the area and is inspired by the active LPAPA art community. She received the second-place award in the Artist Member category.

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Breaking the Rules with Paul Wonner and William Theophilus Brown – an artistic study of nudity, nakedness and utopia – now on display at LAM

Story and Photos by MARRIE STONE

Nakedness and nudity might seem synonymous. In the art world, though, there’s an important distinction. Art critic John Berger made careful study of differences in his 1972 BBC series, Ways of Seeing (and his subsequent 1990 book of the same title). “To be naked is to be oneself,” Berger argued. “To be naked is to be without disguise.” Nudity, by contrast, anticipates the gaze of another (usually the male gaze directed at the female). “To be nude is to be seen naked by others and yet not recognized for oneself.”

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“Breaking the Rules: Paul Wonner and Theophilus Brown” is on display through January 7, 2024 at the Laguna Art Museum

Throughout most of the 20th century, and still in certain circles, heterosexuality was considered the norm. It wasn’t until the second half of the century that laws criminalizing homosexuality were overturned. Psychiatrists still considered it a pathology until 1973, and same sex marriages weren’t granted constitutional protection until 2015. Turning the male gaze back on itself bucked both artistic and cultural tradition. While the art world accepted gay artists like David Hockney, Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns and Andy Warhol, many others worked in relative obscurity.

The curtain closes in two weeks on the Laguna Art Museum’s (LAM) provocative exhibition, Breaking the Rules: Paul Wonner and Theophilus Brown. It’s an installation you shouldn’t miss, if not for its content than for the cultural boundaries and norms these two men broke by living and occasionally depicting a gay lifestyle. It’s the most comprehensive show of the couple’s work to date. While the majority of the exhibition features conventional pieces, including a variety of still lifes, industrial buildings and portraiture, it’s important to consider the impact these two men had on the American art world, especially given the times in which they lived.

Breaking the Rules 10

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In a break with 20th century artistic convention, a woman turns her gaze on male nudity and nakedness at LAM’s provocative exhibition, “Breaking the Rules”

Earlier this month, art historian Daniell Cornell spoke about that topic at LAM, placing Wonner and Brown’s work in cultural context as queer art theory developed in the 20th century. Tracing the evolution of the queer art movement, as well as the lives and careers of both Wonner and Brown, Cornell’s slideshow demonstrated how their work normalized homosexuality in the mid-20th century.

“I’m suggesting that Paul Wonner and Theophilus Brown lived and worked together as a kind of utopian action,” Cornell said. “In contemporary phraseology, they performed their identities as a physical and viable alternative to the cultural norms around them. The fact that they came from entirely different class upbringings also contributes to the utopian dimension of their relationship.”

Breaking the Rules 10

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Art historian Daniell Cornell and LAM Curatorial Fellow Rochelle Steiner after Cornell’s talk, “Celebrating Male Bodies in the Works of Paul Wonner and Theophilus Brown”

Before they became a couple, a relationship that lasted for nearly 56 years, the two men came from opposite sides of the socio-economic tracks. Paul Wonner (1920–2008) grew up in Arizona where his father worked as a railroad conductor. Wonner described his house as a “slum” and his mother as a “paranoid schizophrenic.” But Wonner was a good student and left for Oakland to attend the College of Arts and Crafts. Drafted shortly after graduation in 1941, he served in the U.S. Army for four years.

William Theophilus Brown (1919–2012), by contrast, grew up in Illinois as the son of a mechanical engineer and led a privileged lifestyle. After graduating from a private high school, he attended Yale and frequented the New York art scene, befriending modern art collectors and artists like Elaine and Willem de Kooning who took him under their wing. Brown was also drafted into the Army and, in 1942, began his first relationship (lasting six months) with a Navy sailor.

Brown and Wonner met in 1952 at Berkeley and began a relationship that would last the rest of their lives. While at Berkeley, the couple also met Richard Diebenkorn and Elmer Bischoff, who rented studios in the same Shattuck building where Brown and Wonner worked. Along with David Park, these artists became revolutionary in the Bay Area figurative scene, when abstract expressionism was then in vogue. But as curator Scott Shields notes, that’s just where this show starts. “It continues throughout their career and the many twists and turns along the way.”

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LAM announces museum staff expansion, elevating art and education in the community

Laguna Art Museum (LAM) announced Crystal Tosello as the new development manager and Carl E. Smith taking on the role of exhibition & graphic designer, each bringing a unique blend of talent, dedication and a profound love for the arts to the organization’s staff.

“As we continue to strategically develop our team, Laguna Art Museum is actively enriching our community with art and education. Our team’s talent and dedication to the arts will help propel our mission to new heights,” said Julie Perlin Lee, executive director of the Laguna Art Museum.

lam announces Tosello

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Photos courtesy of LAM

Crystal Tosello joins LAM staff

Development Manager Crystal Tosello has years of experience supporting nonprofits through fundraising, donor relations, communications and marketing. Prior to joining the museum, Tosello served as the director of development at Grandma’s House of Hope. The development manager role is a new addition to the LAM team.

“When I heard about the museum’s desire to bring art to more of the community through creative programming and expanding arts education to reach even more children – I knew I wanted to join the museum and mobilize members and donors to make it happen,” said Tosello.

lam announces Smith

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Exhibition and Graphic Designer Carl E. Smith

Carl E. Smith, a native of Laguna Beach with a remarkable 25-year career in the arts, joins Laguna Art Museum as the ehibition and graphic designer. His extensive experience includes developing brands, content, products and visual design systems for an international client base, as well as organizing exhibitions and participating in international art fairs. Smith’s commitment to arts advocacy is further demonstrated by his ongoing education in the humanities and related projects.

LAM also welcomes Carly Bornmann as development events coordinator, Cami Keller as the collections & registration assistant, Robbin Rundle as education coordinator and Laura Belani as registrar and collections manager.

For more information, visit www.lagunaartmuseum.org.

Laguna Art Museum is located at 307 Cliff Drive in Laguna Beach.

Hours: Tuesday-Sunday: 10 a.m.-5 p.m., closed Mondays, except Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Presidents Day, Memorial Day, Juneteenth and Labor Day. Closed Fourth of July, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day.

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LBCAC adds new event to close out the year

lbcac adds barefoot joel

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Courtesy of LBCAC

Joel Robinson – Barefoot Joel

–Saturday, Dec. 30, 2 p.m.

Storyteller/Naturalist Barefoot Joel/Our Story Nature Walk

Join your friends from the Laguna Beach Cultural Arts Center (LBCAC) and Barefoot Joel, Naturalist Guide, on an easygoing, engaging walk to Barbara’s Lake, the largest of three natural lakes in Laguna Canyon.

During the walk, Barefoot Joel will recall true stories of our area, from the times when grizzly bears, jaguars, condors and wolves still roamed the secluded valley. Together, you’ll stop frequently to appreciate the diversity of plants and wildlife, while learning more about Laguna’s history, including how we got the name “Laguna Beach” (Spoiler alert: It’s not what you think!).

Joel Robinson is the director of Naturalist For You, a 17-year-old environmental education nonprofit based in Orange County. He has guided interpretive nature walks, reenacted living history, restored wildlife habitat, conducted biological surveys and organized environmental classes, workshops, presentations and events for the public benefit since 2001.

Meet at 2 p.m. at the parking lot of Nix Nature Center, 18751 Laguna Canyon Road, Laguna Beach

“Our Story” Nature Walk Details:

Difficulty: The dirt trail is an easy/moderate 1.7-mile loop, with just a few hundred feet of elevation (minimal).

Exposure: Full sun, so please wear a hat and/or sunscreen, along with comfortable trail shoes.

No Food or Drink Provided: Please bring enough for approximately two hours.

Parking: Carpool, $3 daily (machine accepts $1 bills and quarters or Visa/Master Card).

To register, go to www.lbculturalartscenter.org.

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Art as political statement: Duffy show at Cultural Center challenges established societal institutions, practices

By THERESA KEEGAN

Some say the highest calling of art is to challenge the status quo and Ricardo Duffy’s most powerful work certainly does that. From George Washington to major corporations, Duffy lays bare iconoclastic concepts in traditional American culture.

“It brings out angst, but for some reason I really love the political satire,” Duffy said of his work.

His art gives his voice volume, and a retrospective of his work is now being shown at the Laguna Beach Cultural Arts Center (LBCAC). “Ricardo Duffy: Art as Political and Social Commentary” features work ranging from bright, colorful, large murals to sculptural pieces with subtle messaging. Duffy builds upon his cultural background as well as societal commentary.

art as profile

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Courtesy of Ricardo Duffy

Ricardo Duffy was at the opening of his newest retrospective at the Laguna Beach Cultural Arts Center in December

His creativity blends his rich cultural background – that includes indigenous, Irish and Lithuanian heritage – as well as ceramic skills that were academically honed at Ventura College and Cal State Fullerton. His vast exposure to numerous art styles working at Self Help Graphics and Art under the tutelage of Sister Karen Boccalero dominates his work. It was here that Duffy began creating art strongly influenced by the political world around him. He developed great skill as a colorist, embracing vibrant hues as well as clashing them with white Day of the Dead skulls.

He was prolific in this bold art format that came naturally to him, he said. Observing events from a perspective shaped by his family’s indigenous roots, produced no shortage of content.

“For me it (my art) has to do, number one, with the environment,” he said. “I believe in the laws of nature, but the laws of nature are out of balance now. Man has screwed up.”

Throughout his career, Duffy has created many outdoor public art pieces, including a seating installation at the Los Angeles Civic Center Park which features handcrafted tiles of Mayan figures skateboarding as well as a library installation at the Lincoln Heights library featuring a plumed serpent honoring both Latino and Asian communities.

The retrospective of his show at the Cultural Center on Forest Avenue has selected work from the 1990s to the present and they address many issues.

art as room

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Courtesy of Ricardo Duffy

Ricardo Duffy’s work, which also pays tribute to Day of the Dead icons, fills the walls of the entire Cultural Center including in the front room

The dominant almost six-foot-square canvas Not God’s Domain features a coyote springing toward the viewer past a telephone pole that looks like a cross. Various animals appear amid the bold colors, as well as flames and a bicycle.

art as new order

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Courtesy of Ricardo Duffy

“The New Order” by Ricardo Duffy tackles societal issues and dominates a wall in the current exhibit

In the not-quite-so large The New Order (3’ x 4’), a cigarette-smoking George Washington becomes a modern-day Marlboro Man, as he dominates a red desert background with a black ground layer featuring skulls. Along the road a yellow highway marker, used in 1990s California, warns motorists that fleeing migrants were likely in the area. His Prop 187 wordage highlights the state proposition that passed in 1994. It denied health and education to illegal immigrants in the state. The piece was selected for inclusion in the Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s Made in California show in 2000.

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Laguna College of Art + Design Permanent Collection Exhibition on display at the LCAD Gallery through January 21

By MARRIE STONE

Laguna’s permanent art collections seem to be getting more attention these days. Maybe because our institutions are growing old enough that their storied histories warrant celebration. Perhaps we’re in a reflective and nostalgic time in our culture. The Festival of Arts, now in its 92nd year, recently completed the largest showing of its permanent collection at the John Wayne Airport. The Laguna Art Museum, founded in 1918, often showcases selections from its collection. This month, for the first time, the Laguna College of Art + Design (LCAD) unveiled its own exhibition. Roughly one-third of its collection – or 34 pieces – are now on display at the LCAD Gallery on Ocean Avenue through January 21, 2024.

While LCAD was founded in 1961, they’ve been collecting student and alumni pieces since the 1970s. The current exhibition includes work from 2000 through 2023.

laguna college 7

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Photo by Eric Stoner

Gallery Manager Bryan Heggie with Board Member Suzanne Chonette in front of Aidan Baker-Hall’s “Climbing the Cathedral” (2016)

Permanent collections act as both a historical record and a way of studying stylistic, sociological and technological changes over time. Especially for a college like LCAD, where computer gaming and design play such significant roles, compressed time periods yield drastically different work.

“This collection began as an idea almost 20 years ago…with the goal of having the best artworks [to inspire] future art students [and serve] as an example for what they could become,” said LCAD President Steven Brittan at the exhibition opening last Thursday. Always at the forefront of creativity, the College used a percentage of their profits from vending machine sales to help finance the collection.

laguna college 7

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Photo by Eric Stoner

President Steven Brittan addresses the opening of the LCAD Inaugural Permanent Collection at the Gallery on Ocean Avenue

I spoke with several artists whose work is on display about the backstories behind the pieces, their inspirations and how they view their work today.

Timothy Robert Smith: Study Upside Downtown Laguna Beach (LCAD mural), 2013

If you live in Laguna, you’re likely familiar with Timothy Robert Smith (whether you know it or not). Smith’s public murals appear on the LCAD campus, the LBHS campus and, most recently, on the side of Broadway by Amar Santana on Glenneyre. His pieces play with perspective, taking a worm’s eye view of the world from the bottom up.

Smith began his Upside Downtown series a decade ago with a gritty take on downtown Los Angeles (where pigeons are more prominent than Laguna’s seagulls). That piece showed at a solo show at the Copro Gallery in Bergamot Station in Santa Monica. It set the stage for Smith’s later work.

One day in 2017, while working as an adjunct professor at LCAD, Smith approached then-President Jonathan Burke in the parking lot. Doesn’t this old mural need to be replaced, he asked, pointing to the Laguna Canyon wall. Burke agreed. Smith set to work. He’d created a smaller study called Upside Downtown Laguna Beach in 2013. But the painting was a little too risqué for public art. In the study, a woman rides by on a bike wearing a thong bathing suit. Another plays beachball in her bikini. Because the viewer is gazing up from below, that worm’s eye view proved a bit too provocative.

laguna college 7

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Photo by Jeff Rovner

Timothy Robert Smith’s “Study Upside Downtown Laguna Beach” (2013)

“I ended up putting a skirt on the bicyclist,” Smith said. “I changed the woman playing volleyball to a guy who’s wearing swim shorts. I made those a little longer too. It’s the same images, just more kid friendly.”

The family-friendly mural can be seen at LCAD’s Suzanne Chonette Senior Studios parking lot, located at 2295 Laguna Canyon Road. The original risqué study is now on display at the LCAD Gallery with the permanent collection.

“Everyone has their own perception of reality,” Smith said. “I try to see the world from everyone’s POV at once and all these visions come together. My goal is to get people to think about what’s actually happening outside of their own limited perspectives and to demonstrate how these pieces fit together to create the bigger picture.”

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Tickets on sale for 2024 Pageant of the Masters À La Mode: The Art of Fashion beginning July 6, 2024

The 2024 Pageant of the Masters À La Mode: The Art of Fashion will mesmerize audiences with a captivating journey through history’s most iconic fashion trends and spectacles, brought to life through the artistry of living pictures, unforgettable music and engaging storytelling. The Pageant will run from July 6, 2024 through August 30, 2024.

tickets on costumes

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Courtesy of FOA

The Pageant of the Masters runs from July 6 through August 30, 2024, and tickets are on sale now

From the opulent grandeur of royal courts to the contemporary glamor of today’s catwalks, the Pageant will unravel the narrative of attire through the ages, revealing its inherent power and significance.

As preparations for next summer’s show begin, numerous artworks are under consideration for the Pageant’s living pictures including works by French painters like James Tissot and Elisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun and British artist David Hockney. Even the legendary Hollywood designer Edith Head, known for her impeccable sense of style and pioneering work in costume design, may serve as a source of inspiration for this production.

For tickets, click here.

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Last weekend of Winter Fantasy

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

The 33rd Annual Winter Fantasy, taking place in the Sawdust Art Festival grounds, is a one-of-a-kind holiday art festival that offers a festive and unique shopping experience in an enchanting winter wonderland with 168 local artists and makers, three stages of live music, complimentary art and pottery classes, marionette puppet shows, free photos with Santa Claus, and so much more!

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Don’t miss the last weekend of the Sawdust Winter Fantasy, where locals are free with proof of residence on Friday

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Visit Laguna’s own Santa Chuck from 11 a.m.-4 p.m.

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Sheila Anderson’s booth

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Kids can do Christmas crafts

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Jeweler Bea Donnan and curious shoppers

For hours and more information, go to www.sawdustartfestival.org/festivals/winter-fantasy/.

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